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I'm an editor, very amateur photographer, and family history enthusiast from Ireland, but based in Washington, DC.

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John F. Foley

Science Signaling issue of October 4th 2016

1 min read

In this week's issue of Science Signaling, you can read new research papers that show that targeting the receptor tyrosine kinase AXL may help in the treatment of a subtype of ovarian cancer; blocking the kinase JNK reduces the neuroinflammation associated with Japanese encephalitis virus infection; and redistribution of the tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22 to the leading edge of T cells inhibits integrin-mediated adhesion.

Be sure to also check out our Editors' Choice pieces; editor-written summaries of great signaling papers in the literature this week.

https://goo.gl/kzGHRF

John F. Foley

A tale of two signals

2 min read

In their Science Signaling paper, Kim Midwood and colleagues from the University of Oxford investigated how macrophages, among the earliest responding cells of the immune system, interpret two different signals through the same receptor. The first signal, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is a microbial product that stimulates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to induce the production of inflammatory factors. The second, tenascin-C, is an extracellular matrix protein that also acts as a TLR4 agonist. Under normal conditions, tenascin-C is present in low amounts, but its abundance is increased in the context of tissue damage. The authors used proteomics and gene expression analysis to show that exposure of macrophages to LPS caused them to adopt an inflammatory phenotype and make factors that degrade the extracellular matrix. However, when exposed to tenascin-C, the macrophages were less inflammatory and instead produced factors that repair the matrix. Given that TLR4 drove both of these distinct responses, the next step is to figure out the different mechanisms involved. Together, these findings suggest that the behavior of macrophages can be tuned by a single receptor that interprets distinct signals present in the tissue microenvironment.

To see the abstract of this research article, go here: http://stke.sciencemag.org/content/9/443/ra86

For a nice write-up of the paper in The Scientist, follow this link: http://goo.gl/3lMG8v

John F. Foley

Test of quill editor

1 min read

Just trying again...

John F. Foley

Science Signaling: 9 February 2016 issue

1 min read

The latest issue of Science Signaling is now online. This week features one study on the phosphoproteomic analysis of interacting tumor cells and endothelial cells, which identified potential therapeutic targets involved in metastasis, and another research paper that showed how the distribution of a certain opioid receptor in the plasma membrane may underlie the different signaling outcomes that its stimuli, including morphine, elicit. A Review highlights the interplay between signaling research and synthetic biology, and how cells can be engineered with the minimal machinery to endow them with new behaviors and functions. As always, the Editors' Choice section features summaries of other signaling research papers of interest.

http://stke.sciencemag.org/content/9/414

John F. Foley

Science Signaling: 5 January 2016

1 min read

The first issue of Science Signaling of 2016 is out today, and with it comes our traditional look back at the studies that provided breakthroughs in signaling-related research in 2015. These include analyses of cell death mechanisms, insights into the pathogenesis or treatment of diseases such as cancer, and signals used by parasitic plants. You can also listen to a Podcast interview with Chief Scientific Editor Michael Yaffe and Editor Nancy Gough about the current state of signal transduction research. In addition, there are original research papers, including a study by Iain Fraser's group and collaborators on differences in signaling protein use exhibited by Toll-like receptors in human and mouse cells. Such analysis of conserved and species-specific use of signaling proteins could help in study and treatment of human autoimmune diseases. http://stke.sciencemag.org/content/9/409

John F. Foley

Science Signaling issue of September 15

1 min read

In the September 15 issue of Science Signaling, you can read original research papers about how a G protein alpha-subunit mediates cellular proliferation stimulated by the Hedgehog effector Smoothened; how different classes of antigen receptors on the surface of B cells are organized in clusters and the way in which antigen stimulation alters this organization; and about how improving a protein-enrichment technique has enabled detailed analysis of protein phosphorylation patterns in bacteria. There is a Focus article on the Smoothened-G protein signaling axis, as well as editor-curated highlights of the recent literature, including a study of how neutrophils mediate the surgery-induced formation of tumors. http://stke.sciencemag.org/content/8/394

John F. Foley

Science Signaling issue of September 8

1 min read

In the latest issue of Science Signaling, you can read research about how cancer-associated mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF43 prevent it from inhibiting Wnt-beta-catenin signaling; how macrophages can promote atherosclerosis when an ion transporter is activated by a scavenger receptor bound to oxidized LDL; and how the combination of CRISPR and RNAi in a screen helps to identify drug targets. You can also listen to not one, but two Podcast interviews with researchers: one on RNF43 and Wnt signaling, the other on macrophages and atherosclerosis. In this week's Editors' Choice section, research on PI3K, TLRs, and Notch signaling are highlighted. Check out the table of contents here: http://stke.sciencemag.org/content/8/393

John F. Foley

New issue of Science Signaling

1 min read

A new issue of Science Signaling is out. Read research about receptor complexes in plants and the role of ASK kinases in antiviral responses. http://stke.sciencemag.org/

John F. Foley

Testing the Quill Editor

1 min read

After listening to Kevin Marks and Leo Laporte talk about the Quill editor in a recent episode of This Week in Google, I decided to give it a try. It took me a while to get Quill to talk to my Known website, because although I had connected Known to my Twitter account, I hadn't associated my Known site with Twitter. Once I'd figured that out, I was good to go. So this is the first try. I like to listen to discussions about and the concept of publishing on your own site and sharing to other places, but I guess I'm not technically smart enough to figure it all out for myself. I'm also not that social, so I don't have much to share, but I guess that I can work on that. Anyway, I'm about to hit publish, so we'll see what happens.

John F. Foley

Focus on Inflammation

1 min read

The process of inflammation is very important as a response to cell stress, infection, or tissue damage; without inflammation, we would not recover from these insults. However, too much of a good thing can be bad, so if inflammation is left unchecked, it can cause damage and even death. In my day job, I am one of the editors of the scientific journal Science Signaling, and in the 3 March 2015 issue, we have a special focus on inflammation.

For this issue, I wrote anĀ Editorial Guide that highlights recent published research that investigated the mechanisms that promote or resolve inflammation. A better understanding of the molecular players involved in the inflammatory response will result in the development of more effective therapies to treat acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, including sepsis, multiple sclerosis, and arthritis.